OSR Weight Management

Will my cholesterol med give me diabetes?

Posted on June 26, 2015 by to press

“Statin” drugs like atorvastatin, simvastatin, and lovastatin are associated with significant reduction in risk for cardiovascular disease in a vast body of medical research.  This is true for both patients who have never had a heart attack or stroke, and for those who have. What is less clear about these medications is how they affect…
“Statin” drugs like atorvastatin, simvastatin, and lovastatin are associated with significant reduction in risk for cardiovascular disease in a vast body of medical research.  This is true for both patients who have never had a heart attack or stroke, and for those who have. What is less clear about these medications is how they affect blood sugar and diabetes risk. Several small studies have suggested that statin drugs can increase blood sugars, especially for older adults – but there have been confounding factors in these articles that limited data interpretation. A new, much larger population-based study published by Cederberg and colleagues appears to show that statin therapy increased the risk for type 2 diabetes by 46%, even after adjustment for confounding factors. What does this mean for patients?  If you are on a statin drug, should you stop it to prevent diabetes? The answer is not completely clear, and would depend on each individual patientʻs history and risk factors.  Patients at high risk for heart attack or stroke should most likely stay with their statin therapy.  Iʻve also heard the opinion that based on this study, patients in the pre-diabetes range for blood sugar should take additional medication (like metformin) to help prevent diabetes, if they are on a statin. My own 2 cents?  I would highly recommend speaking with us, and/or your own primary care doctor and cardiologist, first, to talk about your own personal situation and health risks, to decide what is optimal.  And remember - lowering your body fat % through medically-supervised weight reduction will do far more to lower your diabetes risk AND your cardiovascular disease risk too - whether you stay with your statin, or not!
Source: Cederberg et al, Diabetologia

Yelp Love!

Posted on June 26, 2015 by to press

To our patients:  Thank you to all your hard work and dedication in taking care of your bodies, and your health – and for all your Yelp LOVE! Check out OSR Weight Management on Yelp Additional Information Read more…
yelp123 To our patients:  Thank you to all your hard work and dedication in taking care of your bodies, and your health - and for all your Yelp LOVE!

Is “social jetlag” influencing your weight?

Posted on June 26, 2015 by to press

You may have heard that lack of sleep can contribute to unhealthy weight gain. More studies are now linking our habit of sleeping against our chronological clocks as being another major factor – and possibly being just as critical as sleeping too little.   This sleeping against our bodies’ natural rhythm is referred to as…
You may have heard that lack of sleep can contribute to unhealthy weight gain. More studies are now linking our habit of sleeping against our chronological clocks as being another major factor – and possibly being just as critical as sleeping too little.   This sleeping against our bodies’ natural rhythm is referred to as “Social Jetlag,” otherwise known as a misaligned circadian system.  Here’s how this happens:  most of us have work schedules that generally require us to wake earlier than our circadian cycles dictate.  Problem is, over time this results in less sleep and a built-up sleep debt.  Plus, our sleep is less efficient and we do not reap the same benefits from sleep.    We then oversleep on weekends and then have more difficulty falling asleep on Sunday nights, perpetuating the circadian misalignment. Circadian rhythms are known to control both sleep timing and energy balance in the body, and disruptions in circadian rhythms have been linked with metabolic dysfunction and obesity-associated disease.  A new cohort study of 815 non-shift workers adds to this body of literature, as it found that individuals displaying even relatively mild social jetlag had higher rates of obesity and risk of metabolic disease. The reasons for this are unknown, but a possibility is that social jetlag disrupts healthy habits such as diet and exercise in a way that may compromise health. Read more here: http://www.nature.com/ijo/journal/v39/n5/abs/ijo2014201a.html?WT.ec_id=IJO-201505
Source: International Journal of Obesity

Added Sugar: What the Food Industry is Hiding from You

Posted on June 26, 2015 by to press

Added sugar is the absolute worst ingredient in the American diet. In the 2014 released documentary “Fed Up” experts team up to explain why everything we have been told about food and exercise for the last 30 years is wrong. The movie follows the process of childhood obesity and dives deeper than what meets the eye.…
Added sugar is the absolute worst ingredient in the American diet. In the 2014 released documentary “Fed Up” experts team up to explain why everything we have been told about food and exercise for the last 30 years is wrong. The movie follows the process of childhood obesity and dives deeper than what meets the eye. As a population, American’s are quick to blame the obese person for their obesity, when this is not actually the problem. The problem is the food industry and the processed food that they are glorifying in order to sell, while providing little to no nutrients to our bodies. In 2013, Hawaii adults were ranked the second lowest obesity rates in the country. (2) Hawaii’s children are also below the nation’s average with 27.4% of children being in the overweight or obese status according to the 2011/12 National Survey of Children’s Health. (3) At Oahu Spine and Rehab in Kailua we work with many chiropractic and physical therapy patients that are also suffering from obesity or being overweight which is why we implemented OSR Weight Management in order to help our patients with their overall health. According to The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, when people eat too much sugar, it overloads the liver, which is forced to turn the sugar into fat. When you are eating foods with little to no nutrients, your body processes them immediately and turns the sugar into fat.
Source: Oahu Spine and Rehab

Ideal Me – Journey to Weight Loss

Posted on June 26, 2015 by to press

All of my adult life I have struggled with my weight. I have tried everything short of gastric bypass.  Most successfully I did South Beach Diet teamed with exercise and lost a significant amount of weight.  I went from 204 lbs on a 5’4” frame to 137 lbs.  I slowly gained it back even though I…
All of my adult life I have struggled with my weight. I have tried everything short of gastric bypass.  Most successfully I did South Beach Diet teamed with exercise and lost a significant amount of weight.  I went from 204 lbs on a 5’4” frame to 137 lbs.  I slowly gained it back even though I swore it would not happen.  Then I had a wedding to plan for.  So I did South Beach Diet coupled with Bikram Yoga and went down from 188 lbs to 153 lbs.  I swore I would not gain it back this time.  Then I got pregnant. Then I did Weight Watchers.  Then I got pregnant again.  I tried my best to eat healthy for the pregnancy but I still gained plenty of weight.  Just before delivery I was toppling the scale at 238 lbs. Of course after delivery I did lose some weight with the help of breast feeding but it was not coming off as quickly as I would have liked it to.  So when my baby was old enough I decided to start calorie counting and exercising.  I was again 204 lbs and in just three and a half months I was able to lose 30 lbs on my own.
Source: Oahu Spine and Rehab

The Best Medicine that Doctors are NOT Prescribing Enough

Posted on June 26, 2015 by to press

If we could give every individual the right amount of nourishment and exercise, not too little and not too much, we would have found the safest way to health. ― Hippocrates The American Heart Association has just released 7 Impact Goals for improving health by 2020:  not smoking, a normal body mass index (BMI), physical…
If we could give every individual the right amount of nourishment and exercise, not too little and not too much, we would have found the safest way to health. ― Hippocrates The American Heart Association has just released 7 Impact Goals for improving health by 2020:  not smoking, a normal body mass index (BMI), physical activity, a healthy diet, normal cholesterol, normal blood pressure, and a normal fasting plasma glucose.  Reason being, an analysis from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey showed that individuals who met five of the seven ideal metrics had a 78% reduction in the hazard ratio for all-cause mortality.  There's no drug on the market that can do ANY of that! "A very short list of lifestyle practices has a more massive influence on our medical destinies than anything else in all of medicine," says Dr David Katz, director of the Yale University Prevention Research Center and president of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine, in a telephone interview. "There's almost nothing in all of medicine that has the vast, consistent, and diverse evidence base."  Agreed!  And best of all, lifestyle changes are free and there are no side effects to worry about.
Source: Medscape Internal Medicine

Taking Control of Your Diabetes

Posted on June 26, 2015 by to press

Are you or a loved one affected by diabetes, prediabetes, gestational diabetes, or the metabolic syndrome?  Come join Dr. Anegawa on April 25, 2015, where she will join a distinguished lineup of speakers at the nationally-renowned “Taking Control of Your Diabetes” conference. Held this year at the Hawaiʻi Convention Center, the conference will address all…
Are you or a loved one affected by diabetes, prediabetes, gestational diabetes, or the metabolic syndrome?  Come join Dr. Anegawa on April 25, 2015, where she will join a distinguished lineup of speakers at the nationally-renowned “Taking Control of Your Diabetes” conference. Held this year at the Hawaiʻi Convention Center, the conference will address all aspects of diabetes treatment and care, diabetes-related health conditions, and patient advocacy. Dr. Anegawa will speak on Non-Surgical Treatment of Obesity at 2pm.  Following her lecture, there will be time for question/answer and breakout group discussions. Learn more about this highly anticipated event, as well as how to register at tcoyd.org. We’ve also got flyers and program info available right in the office at OSR!  All are welcome.
Source: http://tcoyd.org

Pregnancy and Excess Weight Dangers

Posted on June 26, 2015 by to press

OB/Gyn Dr. Claire Putnam relays her concerns about obesity and pregnancy for both moms and babies.  Besides preeclampsia (extreme high blood pressure in pregnancy) and gestational diabetes, the rate of stillborn births are much higher among women with obesity. Whatʻs even worse is that many doctors are still not comfortable addressing these dangers with patients:…
OB/Gyn Dr. Claire Putnam relays her concerns about obesity and pregnancy for both moms and babies.  Besides preeclampsia (extreme high blood pressure in pregnancy) and gestational diabetes, the rate of stillborn births are much higher among women with obesity. Whatʻs even worse is that many doctors are still not comfortable addressing these dangers with patients:  Dr. Putnam notes that in a JAMA study from 2011, only 45 percent of patients with a body mass index of 25 or greater (defined as overweight) and 66 percent of patients with a B.M.I. of 30 or greater (defined as obese) reported having been told by a doctor that they were overweight.  Weight can be viewed as a sensitive subject for women, but the risks of avoiding these discussions with our patients are very high. If you are considering pregnancy, take action for yourself and your baby, and get your Body Mass Index measured as soon as possible.  You owe it to both yourself and your future child to be in the best shape of your life - and OSR Weight can help you along the way.
Source: New York Times

The “D” blues and your weight

Posted on June 26, 2015 by to press

Patients with obesity have a higher rate of Vitamin D deficiency than the general population. One major reason is that Vitamin D is fat-soluable, so for the overweight, more of your D is locked up in fat cells and less is readily available in the bloodstream. Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to many problems…
Patients with obesity have a higher rate of Vitamin D deficiency than the general population. One major reason is that Vitamin D is fat-soluable, so for the overweight, more of your D is locked up in fat cells and less is readily available in the bloodstream. Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to many problems including premature bone loss, impaired immunity and even heart disease.  One intriguing new study also correlates low D levels with depression in otherwise healthy women. People with depression often lack motivation to make positive lifestyle changes.  If youʻve struggled with motivation issues on your path to improve your health, and/or fatigue, and especially if you know you have issues with your bones, I highly recommend getting your D level checked along with the rest of your metabolic blood work, as we do in our practice.  This new study is not conclusive yet, but the implications are clear.  Lifestyle change is hard enough - why fight an uphill metabolic battle?
Source: David CR et al,Psy.Res 2015;DOI:10.1016

Sugar cravings? Get moving!

Posted on June 26, 2015 by to press

Earlier studies have shown that exercise can reduce hunger and cravings in normal weight people. New research shows that the same may hold true for the overweight. 47 people who identified themself as sugary snack eaters were broken into two groups (one walker group, and one control group) after being deprived of sugar for 3…
Earlier studies have shown that exercise can reduce hunger and cravings in normal weight people. New research shows that the same may hold true for the overweight. 47 people who identified themself as sugary snack eaters were broken into two groups (one walker group, and one control group) after being deprived of sugar for 3 days.  The snackers who walked were noted afterwards to have a lower self-reported desire for sugar and their physiologic responses to seeing sugar were attenuated. What is really neat about this study is that it didnʻt take much walking - only 15 minutes - to have a significant effect.  Itʻs easy to put this small amount of physical activity into practice right away without special equipment or a lot of effort or expense.  So start kicking your cravings to the curb!   Source: plos.org