OSR Weight Management

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Posted on October 12, 2016 by to press

By: Dr. Linda Anegawa October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, a global campaign to increase awareness of the disease. Adult women of all ages are encouraged to perform breast self-exams at least once a month, according to the National Breast Cancer Foundation. There are several environmental and lifestyle risk factors that could potentially influence the…
By: Dr. Linda Anegawa October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, a global campaign to increase awareness of the disease. Adult women of all ages are encouraged to perform breast self-exams at least once a month, according to the National Breast Cancer Foundation. There are several environmental and lifestyle risk factors that could potentially influence the development of breast cancer, including: • Lack of Physical Activity: A sedentary lifestyle with little physical activity can increase your risk for breast cancer. • Poor Diet: A diet high in saturated fat and lacking fruits and vegetables can increase your risk for breast cancer. • Being Overweight or Obese: Being overweight or obese can increase your risk for breast cancer. Your risk is increased if you have already gone through menopause. • Drinking Alcohol: Frequent consumption of alcohol can increase your risk for breast cancer. The more alcohol you consume, the greater the risk. source: The National Breast Cancer Foundation, INC. avera

Low Carbohydrate Dietary Intervention Improves Insulin, Hormonal Levels and Inflammatory Markers in Early Stage, Postmenopausal Breast Cancer Survivors

A study published by the Avera Cancer Institute shows that low carbohydrate dietary intervention improves insulin, hormonal levels and inflammatory markers in early stage, postmenopausal breast cancer survivors. The results of the study concluded that: 1. A low carbohydrate dietary intervention can successfully be implemented in a group of overweight breast cancer survivors to achieve significant amounts of weight loss 2. A rapid and significant reduction in serum hormonal levels and serum inflammatory markers can be achieved with dietary intervention 3. This feasibility study provides additional support for larger trials evaluating the role of carbohydrate restriction in cancer survivors

Halloween Tips

Posted on October 10, 2016 by to press

By: Kelli Wilson Fill up before trick-or-treating Try eating your healthy IP snack or dinner before heading out.  Another trick is to prepare your evening IP snack before you head out. Try cutting your favorite IP bar into bite size pieces and freezing them. Then when you return from trick-or-treating, you can enjoy a sweet…

By: Kelli Wilson

Fill up before trick-or-treating Try eating your healthy IP snack or dinner before heading out.  Another trick is to prepare your evening IP snack before you head out. Try cutting your favorite IP bar into bite size pieces and freezing them. Then when you return from trick-or-treating, you can enjoy a sweet treat with everyone while staying on track! Get Exercise While Your Kids Trick-or-Treat Walk with your children from house to house instead of driving them. Make a friendly game out of it by seeing who’s most active for the night; have your friends or family members track their evening with their apple watch, pedometer, or Fitbit, to see who wins! Hand out healthier food options, toothbrushes, and/or toys By choosing more healthy options or by passing out non-edible treats, you are less likely to be tempted to indulge yourself! Party success If you are planning to attend a Halloween party, bring a dish that you can enjoy along with everyone else.  Get creative by making fun veggie tray or check out Janeva’s Ideal Recipes for ideas. Make a Plan Make a plan for the candy…the main goal being to get that candy out of the house! No matter how much “self-control” you have – you will eat it if it’s in the house and so will your kids. Check with your family dentist or see if there is a dental office near you that is taking in candy in trade for fun items. You can also have your children make two candy piles 50/50: one for the candy they want to keep, another for the candy they will not eat. Consider donating the second pile Ronald McDonald House, or another wonderful charity. In the process, children can learn a valuable lesson about givingJ Drink Up Don’t forget to stay hydrated!

“Is this OK on Phase 1?”

Posted on August 2, 2016 by to press

By: Dr. Anegawa Besides what’s on the Phase 1 sheet, dieters often wonder about the ‘extras’ – sugar-substitute products that may seem OK to incorporate.  There are sugar-free gums, drink additives, diet sodas, and of course those Walden Farms salad dressings.  Why shouldn’t we be able to add these in?   Overall, these products are…
By: Dr. Anegawa Besides what’s on the Phase 1 sheet, dieters often wonder about the ‘extras’ – sugar-substitute products that may seem OK to incorporate.  There are sugar-free gums, drink additives, diet sodas, and of course those Walden Farms salad dressings.  Why shouldn’t we be able to add these in?   Overall, these products are probably safe to use without jeopardizing weight loss – but the key word is PROBABLY.  Even 0g/0g carb/sugar products still contain trace carbs and sugar – it is just that per serving size, the amounts are so negligible that it manufacturers are permitted to label it as as 0g/0g.  So if you ate an entire bottle of Walden Farms salad dressing in one day, you’d actually be ingesting a fair amount of carbs.  We don’t know the exact carb threshold in each individual for when you’ll be kicked out of ketosis – every person’s body is very different!   Some dieters are in fact quite carb-sensitive, and adding even tiny amounts of extras in can slow weight loss.  So if you are using lots of WF or other 0/0 labelled products out there and you find your weight loss slowing, you may need to consider cutting back on the amounts, or eliminating altogether.  And always journal EVERYTHING you eat, so that our coaches can help you understand your numbers and measurements in relation to what you take in.

The Importance of Journaling

Posted on June 7, 2016 by to press

You can’t change what you can’t measure! According to various research, people who keep food journals are more likely to be successful in losing weight and keeping it off. There are several benefits of journaling, including: Creating accountability Tracking progress Identifying patterns or triggers (ie: overeating at night, emotional eating) Increasing awareness of what you…
You can’t change what you can’t measure! According to various research, people who keep food journals are more likely to be successful in losing weight and keeping it off. There are several benefits of journaling, including:
  • Creating accountability
  • Tracking progress
  • Identifying patterns or triggers (ie: overeating at night, emotional eating)
  • Increasing awareness of what you are eating
  • Identifying areas/foods of concern and extra calories
The journal is the most important tool for our dieters and coaches.  For a coach it will discern dieter habits and help you make the necessary adjustments in weekly coaching sessions. Short of being with your Dieter 24 hours a day it is the only tool that will help you gain insight into their daily habits and will be key to helping Dieters achieve their goals. By enforcing the journal right from the start it will create a habit for Dieters and will help them sustain this habit once they reach phase 4 and beyond. Just as we would not go to the gym without our running shoes, a dieter should not be coming to a weekly coaching session without their journal. Our Daily Journal (Phase 1-3) has been designed specifically for Dieters to keep track of what and how much they are eating and drinking and to ensure that they are consuming the daily required amount of supplements. The Phase 4 journal is aligned to our Ideal Lifestyle Approach to Maintenance and incorporates the key concepts of phase 4. In addition to the food diary it also allows Dieters to monitor their sleep habits, daily activity, indulgence days, slip-ups and portion control; providing guidelines for enjoying their new Lifestyle.

Lessons from “The Biggest Loser” – Our Take

Posted on May 4, 2016 by to press

By. Dr. Linda Anegawa It seems everyone is talking about the article published this week in the New York Times, about the long-term outcomes of some of the most successful dieters in “The Biggest Loser” (hereafter referred to as “TBL”) reality TV series.   This research, published in the journal Obesity, looked at long-term outcomes of…
By. Dr. Linda Anegawa It seems everyone is talking about the article published this week in the New York Times, about the long-term outcomes of some of the most successful dieters in “The Biggest Loser” (hereafter referred to as “TBL”) reality TV series.   This research, published in the journal Obesity, looked at long-term outcomes of some of the most successful dieters, in terms of total pounds lost.   The article claims to portray a depressing fact of these participants’ weight losses:  many of them not only regained weight 6 years later, but some regained large amounts of weight – even as much as 100 pounds.   What a buzz this has created on social media, and in our office!  Dieters are wondering (and rightly so):  (1) why diet in the first place at all, if we are destined to gain a bunch of it, or even ALL of it back?   And: (2) we know our metabolisms slow with weight loss, so to maintain the loss, will we actually have to munch only celery sticks forever, and forbid even the slightest indulgences?   I heard an NPR segment in response, where it was pointed out that regaining 100 pounds might not be a total disaster.  The physician-speaker argued that while the TBL dieters had regained, they were still mostly below their initial start weight.  And, extensive clinical research documents that small amounts of weight loss can have great health benefits.  While itʻs true that 5-10% loss of excess weight can be beneficial for sure, to me (and maybe to many of you) that feels almost like a consolation prize, after all that hard work.   Here are some of my theories about TBLʻs dieters, and what may have contributed to their current weight woes:
  1. The TBL dieters’ insulin resistance/metabolic syndrome tendencies were incompletely addressed. By having our dieters at OSR Weight follow the Ideal Protein protocol, we ensure that first, insulin hypersecretion is reversed through diet – the pancreas “rests” if you will. Then, through the gentle and very gradual re-introduction of small amounts of dietary carbohydrates, the pancreas is slowly “restarted”.  Without going through this pancreas-resting and then re-starting process, individuals with metabolic syndrome will tend to regain weight quite rapidly if carbs are re-introduced in too great amounts, or too frequently in the diet.  I’ve definitely witnessed this firsthand in the last year of prescribing the Ideal Protein protocol for patients.  What’s more is, the study’s authors even point this out themselves:  “Interestingly, insulin resistance was not significantly improved 6 years after the competition compared with baseline despite significant weight loss.”  Not a surprise.
  2. Overall very little was revealed about the TBI dieters’ intake or metabolic status. Were dieters eating adequate protein?  How many carbs did they consume, exactly?  What was fat intake – and was it healthy fat with plenty of Omega-3s?  Improper diet can dramatically impact weight regain.  Were dieters screened for other hormonal issues such as low testosterone in the men?  Hormonal imbalance can adversely affect healthy weight maintenance, sometimes dramatically.
  3. Issues of body image and adjustment to a new frame were likely incompletely addressed. During and after weight loss, both the conscious and sub-conscious mind needs to adjust to the dieter’s new size, a process which psychologists say can take at least a year.  If in a dieterʻs sub-conscious mind she still sees herself as obese, she will gravitate towards eating more food than is necessary to maintain a slimmer frame, and thus regain weight.  Strategies which can be helpful for adjustment include taking photos every 15-20 pounds throughout the transformation, professional counseling, support groups, and frequent dieter followup, especially early in the maintenance phase when dieters are most vulnerable.   It’s not clear from the study that any of this was done for the TBL dieters.
  4. The prevalence of eating disorders may have been undetected and thus incompletely addressed with TBLʻs protocols. Eating disorders such as binge eating disorder, bulimia, and night eating disorder are under-recognized and under-treated in those who are 100 or more pounds overweight.  No diet can ever possibly treat these complex disorders alone!  We often recommend that individuals with suspected eating disorders first undergo a psychological assessment prior to attempting healthy lifestyle change.  Otherwise, dieters are doomed to fail before they even start.
  5. No reference was made to any kind of weight maintenance protocol for TBL alumni to help keep them on track. Unlike Ideal Proteinʻs phase 4 which gives our dieters clear rules, behaviors, and education to stay healthy and manage occasional indulgences, Iʻm not sure that the TBL dieters had this comprehensive of a plan in place, which places them at a significant disadvantage.
  No matter how we look at this study though, there’s much that we just donʻt get about fat mass disease.  Nutrient composition is important, as is dieter education and support.  But looking at both weight loss AND maintenance as an ongoing, holistic, lifelong process, with a comprehensive management system to aide the dieter – this may be the most critical.   We need to cultivate a “maintenance mindset” right from the start, as diets in themselves clearly can’t FIX any particular problem.     Link to New York Times article: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/02/health/biggest-loser-weight-loss.html?_r=0   Link to the research study: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/oby.21538/full

Dieting With Your SO: Should You Do It?

Posted on April 27, 2016 by to press

One of the most difficult parts of doing a diet can revolve around your relationship with your Significant Other. If you’re living together, but you’re the only one dieting, it can be a nightmare – especially if much of your couple’s time together revolved around food-related activities like dining out.   Here at OSR Weight…
One of the most difficult parts of doing a diet can revolve around your relationship with your Significant Other. If you’re living together, but you’re the only one dieting, it can be a nightmare – especially if much of your couple’s time together revolved around food-related activities like dining out.   Here at OSR Weight Management, we have observed partners that diet together often have the easiest time adapting to a new lifestyle, as well as achieving the best results from weight loss.  There are probably a few reasons for this.   The biggest hurdles to dieting are often the temptations to “cheat” on your diet, or eat foods that are not part of the protocol.  One great way to eliminate the temptation is to rid your home entirely of all of these foods and then not buy them at the store – far easier when both of you are sticking to the same healthy diet.  But of course, when you have a spouse who is NOT dieting with you, you may get some push back on throwing out all of the junk.   Another big hurdle is the daily cooking and meal preparation – on the Ideal Protein phase 1 protocol, it is required to prepare 1 protein-based meal daily plus 4 cups of vegetables.  If you and your SO diet together, you can share grocery shopping and cooking duties.  Plus, it can be an adventure to explore together what giant bags of precut veggies Costco or Samʻs might have week by week!   Diets can also cause mood swings. If your body was previously used to getting certain amounts of sugars and unhealthy carbs, you may go through withdrawals or major cravings for these items.  This can leave you in an emotionally fragile state for a few days when you start.  Of course, if your SO is also going through the same thing, chances are higher that the couple will be supportive of each other’s progress and listen to each others’ frustrations.   Probably the biggest advantage though of dieting as a couple though, is the joy you get to share in getting healthier together, and bonding through genuine lifestyle change.   For more information, attend one of our complimentary Infosessions here at OSR Weight Management.   SOʻs are always welcome!  

Got Knee Pain?  Noninvasive Treatment Almost Always Best

Posted on April 26, 2016 by to press

by: Dr. Linda Anegawa Knee symptoms are the most common musculoskeletal symptom among patients seeing PCPs in the USA, according to the 2012 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey.     In most cases, except where breaks or infection are felt to be likely, nonsurgical treatments should always be recommended first.  Physical therapy and other integrative care modalities should also…

by: Dr. Linda Anegawa

Knee symptoms are the most common musculoskeletal symptom among patients seeing PCPs in the USA, according to the 2012 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey.  

 

In most cases, except where breaks or infection are felt to be likely, nonsurgical treatments should always be recommended first.  Physical therapy and other integrative care modalities should also play a leading role for at least 6 weeks, according to experts at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York.   Strengthening of knee support muscles under the guidance of a trained clinician can be highly effective.

 

In addition to physical therapy, weight loss can play a critical role in alleviating knee pain.  For every extra pound a person carries, the knee must bear an extra 5 pounds of force. Multiple studies have linked weight loss with reduction of symptoms and improved function among those who are obese - even in patient with end-stage osteoarthritis symptoms.  Besides just symptoms though, a study in the Annals of Rheumatic Diseases in 2014 showed that among 112 obese individuals, their percentage of weight loss corresponded to a reduction in their knee cartilage loss.  What this means:  actual reversal of disease!

 

Read more here:

http://www.acpinternist.org/archives/2016/04/knees.htm

Curing Type II Diabetes: Is it possible?

Posted on April 19, 2016 by to press

By: Dr. Linda Anegawa A headline in the New York Times yesterday, “Hope for Reversing Type II Diabetes,” expresses great surprise at what we have observed in our practice:  an endless cycle of ever-increasing medications is probably not the way to go in the care of this dread disease. Afflicting millions of Americans, Diabetes can…

By: Dr. Linda Anegawa

A headline in the New York Times yesterday, "Hope for Reversing Type II Diabetes," expresses great surprise at what we have observed in our practice:  an endless cycle of ever-increasing medications is probably not the way to go in the care of this dread disease.

Afflicting millions of Americans, Diabetes can cause kidney failure, heart disease, blindness, and nerve damage.  Long described as incurable, the medical establishment has had us believe that more medications in higher doses is the only real solution.

The study described in the New York Times describes the exact opposite phenomenon:  that weight reduction can, in many cases, effect a complete diabetes cure.

What weʻve witnessed in our patients who have gotten the weight off has been exactly the same phenomenon.   

Are YOU treating your dietary indiscretions (aka Diabetes type II) with drugs, instead of with lifestyle change?  Remember, with every bite we eat, we either feed disease or fight it.

Read more here:  

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/04/18/hope-for-reversing-type-2-diabetes/?smid=fb-nytwell&smtyp=cur&_r=0

“What do I do when I have to eat out… and the menu is NOT part of my diet?”

Posted on April 18, 2016 by to press

Parties, business lunches, celebrations and luaus are often a fun part of life – except when you are trying to change your eating habits.  You find yourself working SO hard to stick to protocol, only to feel like it could all go out the window with one pau hana!   So what is a dieter to…
Parties, business lunches, celebrations and luaus are often a fun part of life – except when you are trying to change your eating habits.  You find yourself working SO hard to stick to protocol, only to feel like it could all go out the window with one pau hana!   So what is a dieter to do?  Here are some situations you may find yourself in, and how to cope.  
  1. Restaurants: Always look up the online menu beforehand so you have an idea of what type of offerings are there.  If there is no online menu, call ahead!  You can never prepare too much – it is just not worth being surprised and then unintentionally throwing yourself out of ketosis.  At the establishment, whenever possible, see if you can order individual dishes rather than going ʻfamily styleʻ which will give you more control over your order.  Your best bet is to simply tell the waiter that you are on a very strict diet for medical reasons, and need a simply prepared item (such as grilled fish with lemon/salt/pepper and a plain salad).  We are lucky that we live Hawaiʻi and chefs are very used to accommodating visitors from all over who follow special diets.  It never hurts to ask for exactly what you want!
  2. Office parties: If catered, try to be a part of menu planning and make sure lean, non-breaded proteins and salad are on the menu.  If itʻs potluck, thatʻs even easier, because you can prepare and bring exactly what you want to contribute!
  3. Other non-potluck events/parties where you donʻt have say over the menu: do the best you can to only choose to eat a lean, non-breaded protein item plus a green vegetable or salad.  Prepare yourself beforehand by making sure you have a healthy IP snack or a protein-rich snack so you are not starving once you are at the party – youʻll be far less tempted to cheat.  Drink plenty of water throughout the event, and try to focus less on the food and more on the company.

Weight Loss Tips From The Best

Posted on April 6, 2016 by to press

  Lifestyle change takes time and effort.  You can help speed up the process with these great hints from a seasoned health coach! Click here to read some awesome tips!

 

Lifestyle change takes time and effort.  You can help speed up the process with these great hints from a seasoned health coach!

Click here to read some awesome tips!